June 2018 Recommended Reading Theme: “Fathers”

In the United States, the month of June holds a day devoted to fathers; June 17, 2018.

Get more information about our “Fathers” theme from the following locations and follow us on social media.

Here is a link to a video from TEDxMidAtlantic:

What I’ve learned about parenting as a stay-at-home dad by Glen Henry (Visual Storyteller)

Video description: Glen Henry got his superpowers through fatherhood. After leaving behind a job he hated and a manager he didn’t get along with, he went to work for an equally demanding boss: his kids. He shares how he went from thinking he knew it all about being a stay-at-home parent to realizing he knew nothing at all — and how he’s now documenting what he’s learned.

Here are some books from the library, currently displayed on the Recommended Reading shelf.
Do Fathers Matter? by Paul Raeburn

Call Number: 155.6462 R134d 2015

ISBN: 9780374535353

Publication Date: 2015-06-02

For too long, we’ve thought of fathers as little more than sources of authority and economic stability in the lives of their children. Yet cutting-edge studies drawing unexpected links between fathers and children are forcing us to reconsider our assumptions and ask new questions: What changes occur in men when they are “expecting”? Do fathers affect their children’s language development? What are the risks and rewards of being an older-than-average father at the time the child is born? What happens to a father’s hormone levels at every stage of his child’s development, and can a child influence the father’s health? Just how much do fathers matter?

The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini

Call Number: 813.6 H829k 2015

ISBN: 9781594631931

Publication Date: 2013-03-05

An epic tale of fathers and sons, of friendship and betrayal, that takes us from Afghanistan in the final days of the monarchy to the atrocities of the present day. The unforgettable, heartbreaking story of the unlikely friendship between a wealthy Afghan youth and the son of his father’s servant, The Kite Runner is a beautifully crafted novel set in a country that is in the process of being destroyed. It is about the power of reading, the price of betrayal, and the possibility of redemption. It is also about the power of fathers over sons: their love, their sacrifices, and their lies.

New Black Man by Mark Anthony Neal

Call Number: 305.3 N342n 2015

ISBN: 9781138792586

Publication Date: 2015-02-23

From headlines to street corners, the message resounds: Black men are in crisis. Politicians, preachers, and pundits routinely cast blame on those already ostracized within African American communities. But the crisis of black masculinity does not rest with “at-risk” youth of the hip-hop generation or men “on the down low” alone. In this provocative new book, acclaimed cultural critic Mark Anthony Neal argues that the “Strong Black Man”-an ideal championed by generations of African American civic leaders-may be at the heart of problems facing black men today.

The Sellout by Paul Beatty

Call Number: 813.54 B369s 2015

ISBN: 9780374260507

Publication Date: 2015-03-03

A biting satire about a young man’s isolated upbringing and the race trial that sends him to the Supreme Court, Paul Beatty’s The Sellout showcases a comic genius at the top of his game. It challenges the sacred tenets of the United States Constitution, urban life, the civil rights movement, the father-son relationship, and the holy grail of racial equality–the black Chinese restaurant. Born in the “agrarian ghetto” of Dickens–on the southern outskirts of Los Angeles–the narrator of The Sellout resigns himself to the fate of lower-middle-class Californians. Raised by a single father, a controversial sociologist, he spent his childhood as the subject in racially charged psychological studies. He is led to believe that his father’s pioneering work will result in a memoir that will solve his family’s financial woes. But when his father is killed in a police shoot-out, he realizes there never was a memoir. All that’s left is the bill for a drive-thru funeral. Fueled by this deceit and the general disrepair of his hometown, the narrator sets out to right another wrong: Dickens has literally been removed from the map to save California from further embarrassment. Enlisting the help of the town’s most famous resident–the last surviving Little Rascal, Hominy Jenkins–he initiates the most outrageous action conceivable: reinstating slavery and segregating the local high school, which lands him in the Supreme Court.

The Song Poet by Kao Kalia Yang

ISBN: 9781627794947

Publication Date: 2016-05-10

In the Hmong tradition, the song poet recounts the story of his people, their history and tragedies, joys and losses; extemporizing or drawing on folk tales, he keeps the past alive, invokes the spirits and the homeland, and records courtships, births, weddings, and wishes. Kao Kalia Yang now retells the life of her father Bee Yang, the song poet, a Hmong refugee in Minnesota, driven from the mountains of Laos by America’s Secret War.

Generation Unbound by Isabel V. Sawhill

Call Number: 306.8 S271g 2014

ISBN: 9780815725589

Publication Date: 2014-09-25

Over half of all births to young adults in the United States now occur outside of marriage, and many are unplanned. The result is increased poverty and inequality for children. The left argues for more social support for unmarried parents; the right argues for a return to traditional marriage. In Generation Unbound, Isabel V. Sawhill offers a third approach: change “drifters” into “planners.” In a well-written and accessible survey of the impact of family structure on child well-being, Sawhill contrasts “planners,” who are delaying parenthood until after they marry, with “drifters,” who are having unplanned children early and outside of marriage. These two distinct patterns are contributing to an emerging class divide and threatening social mobility in the United States. Sawhill draws on insights from the new field of behavioral economics, showing that it is possible, by changing the default, to move from a culture that accepts a high number of unplanned pregnancies to a culture in which adults only have children when they are ready to be a parent.

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