August 2018 Recommended Reading: Summer in the Wild

The Library’s Recommended Reading theme for August 2018 is “Summer in the Wild”.

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Great things can happen when you explore. Don’t let summer pass without trying a little or a lot of adventure outside.

Here are some ideas:

  1. Try a short walk around your neighborhood during a summer evening, a picnic at a city park, or a day hike on one of the local urban trails.
  2. Want a local adventure outside the city? Try backpacking or camping at a state or national park.
  3. Finally, the United States, North America, and the world are full of places to explore. Talk to a librarian to learn more!

TEDSalon Video: Why bother leaving the house? 

Speaker: Ben Saunders at TEDSalon London Fall 2012.

Video description:

Explorer Ben Saunders wants you to go outside! Not because it’s always pleasant and happy, but because that’s where the meat of life is, “the juice that we can suck out of our hours and days.” Saunders’ next outdoor excursion? To try to be the first in the world to walk from the coast of Antarctica to the South Pole and back again.

Get more information about our August theme from the following locations and follow us on social media.

Get ready for an outdoor adventure, or read about adventures and environmental activism with these books.

Brand-new header info for all 60 hikes includes vital information on hiking with dogs. There is also updated trail information, text, maps, and/or photos, etc., for such hikes as Iron Goat Trail, Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge, Dirty Harry’s Peak, Flaming Geyser State Park, Mailbox Peak, Franklin Falls, and many others. In addition, the book covers Washington State’s two newest Wilderness Areas, Wild Sky Wilderness (established 2008) and Alpine Lakes Wilderness (expanded in 2014).

Get ready for your next backcountry trip with advice on making the most of your time outdoors. Based on the 5Cs of Survivability–cutting tools, covering, combustion devices, containers, and cordages–this valuable guide offers only the most important survival skills to help you craft resources from your surroundings and truly experience the beauty and thrill of the wilderness. Inside, you’ll also discover detailed information on: Choosing the right items for your kit. Manufacturing needed tools and supplies. Collecting and cooking food. Protecting yourself from the elements. With Canterbury’s guidance, you’ll not only prepare yourself for any climate and situation, you’ll also learn how to use the art of bushcraft to reconnect with nature in ways you’ve never imagined.

Planning an outdoor adventure? Make sure to consult this information-packed and photo-filled North American field guide–arranged by season and region–before you go! 400 color photos and detailed information on more than 200 species of edible plants all across North America. Each entry includes images, plus facts on the plant’s habitat, physical properties, harvesting, preparation, and poisonous look-alikes. The introduction contains tempting recipes and there’s a quick-reference seasonal key for each plant.

Hiking Waterfalls in Washington includes detailed hike descriptions, maps, and color photos of the area’s most scenic waterfall hikes. Explore Madison Creek Falls on the Olympic Peninsula, trek through the North Cascades forest to Cedar Hollow Falls, or discover Comet Falls in the iconic Mt. Rainier National Park. Look inside to Find: Hikes suited to every ability, Mile-by-mile directional cues, GPS coordinates, Trail Finder to help choose the best hike for you-including hikes with back-country camping, swimming holes, and roadside waterfalls.

The author explores the dramatic story of the origins of the public domain, including the century-long push toward privatization and the subsequent emergence of a national conservation ideal. Arguing that we cannot fully understand one type of public land without understanding its relation to the rest of the system, he provides in-depth accounts of the different types of public lands. Including chapters on national parks, national forests, wildlife refuges, Bureau of Land Management lands, and wilderness areas, Wilson examines key turning points and major policy debates for each land type.

Edward Abbey’s account of two summers spent in southeastern Utah’s canyonlands. He tells of his stint as a park ranger at Arches National Monument, of his love for the natural beauty that surrounded him, and of his distaste for the modernizing improvements designed to increase visitation to the park. “I confess to being a nature lover,” admits Abbey more than thirty years after his sojourn in the wilderness. “But I did not mean to be mistaken for a nature writer. I never wanted to be anything but a writer, period.” Desert Solitaire lives on because it is a work that reflects profound love of nature and a bitter abhorrence of all that would desecrate it.

From the Sierras to the Adirondacks and the Everglades, Dan White travels the nation to experience firsthand–and sometimes face first–how the American wilderness transformed from the devil’s playground into a source of adventure, relaxation, and renewal. Whether he’s camping nude in cougar country, being attacked by wildlife while “glamping,” or crashing a girls-only adventure for urban teens, Dan White seeks to animate the evolution of outdoor recreation. In the process, he demonstrates how the likes of Emerson, Thoreau, Roosevelt, and Muir–along with visionaries such as Adirondack Murray, Horace Kephart, and Juliette Gordon Low–helped blaze a trail from Transcendentalism to Leave No Trace. Wide-ranging in research, enthusiasm, and geography, Under the Stars reveals a vast population of nature seekers, a country still in love with its wild places.

Walden is Thoreau’s autobiographical account of his Robinson Crusoe existence, bare of creature comforts but rich in contemplation of the wonders of nature and the ways of man. On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience is the classic protest against government’’s interference with individual liberty, and is considered one of the most famous essays ever written.

Set among lava sinkholes and logging camps at the fringe of the Northwest frontier in the early 1900s, WILD LIFE charts the life — both real and imagined — of the free-thinking, cigar-smoking, trouser-wearing Charlotte Bridger Drummond, who pens popular women’s adventure stories. One day, when a little girl gets lost in the woods, Charlotte anxiously joins the search and embarks on an adventure all her own. With great assurance and skill, Molly Gloss quickly transforms what at first seems to be pitch-perfect historical fiction into a kind of wild and woolly mystery story, as Charlotte herself becomes lost in the dark and tangled woods and falls into the company of an elusive band of mountain giants.

If you have questions or need assistance, Ask a Librarian at refhelp@highline.edu.

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